The Meaning of Thanksgiving

Posted by Southwest Beverages on 11/24/2016

Since first published in 2013, many of the blog followers, customers and vendors of Southwest Beverages have asked us to republish the following blog each Thanksgiving because it touched their hearts, made them have discussions at their Thanksgiving table with their family members about their past, which then strengthened their family values and instilled in them the need for us to help those less fortunate.

Happy Thanksgiving, Susan, Kevin & Bob Jenkins, Co-Founders, Southwest Beverages

As I was flying into Chicago last week, I looked out the window of the plane and down onto that beautiful city and thought-in one week not only will the 10 million people of Chicago sit down to basically the same turkey Thanksgiving meal, but all of America will do likewise and all within three to four hours of one another. Mindboggling, to say the least, and certainly a long way from the first Thanksgiving of 1620.

The first Thanksgiving in America took place, when the local native Americas and the remaining 56 pilgrims of the original 102 pilgrim/colonists who first journeyed to America each combined food produced from their plentiful harvests, to have a celebration, which continued for three days. Over the next 169 years the celebration became more family oriented to the extent when in 1789, following a resolution of Congress, President George Washington proclaimed Thursday the 26th of November a day of, “public thanksgiving and prayer” devoted to “the service of that great and glorious Being who is the beneficent Author of all the good that was, that is, or that will be.” In 1863, President Lincoln set the last Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day. In 1941, Congress declared it a federal holiday.

But what does Thanksgiving really mean?

Thanksgiving is a day when we stop our busy lives and give thanks to God for all the good fortune we have in our lives. At its most basic level, it’s a celebration of survival, health, fruitfulness and family. It is also that day when we give thanks for the tangible things we have in life: a job, food on our table, and a couple dollars in the bank.

At our house, it has been a long-standing family tradition to ask each family member around the table what specifically they are thankful for. The answers to this question, and the individual discussions that follows, defines each family member’s values and beliefs and collectively defines the value system of us as a family. Note: Young children often have a hard time expressing their thanks because so many of the things that they unknowingly give thanks for have been provided to them at this point in their lives by their parents, so you’ll have to teach them by example.

Thanksgiving Day is also a good opportunity to teach the younger family members about their heritage and the struggles the family has overcome. While it is easy and pleasant to discuss the successes of the family, and by all means have that discussion, don’t be ashamed about the “hard-times” your family might have experienced in it past, but learn from it. For example, my Grandmother told me how during the Great Depression my Grandfather came to tears one day because as a man he could no longer provide for his family as there simply were no jobs and he had only seven cents in his pocket. Over the past 70 years that story has helped shape the lives of many of my family members.

However you celebrate Thanksgiving, find the time to be with people you love and remember to please help those less fortunate than you. The $15.00 you would have spent purchasing a pie would be much more appreciated by someone “down on their luck” who is in desperate need of receiving a new pair of warm socks or gloves, or a warm meal than “Uncle Johnny” eating a third piece of pie for dessert. This is the meaning of Thanks-giving.

dry mix beveragesWritten by Bob Jenkins, Founder & Chief Executive Officer of Southwest Beverages

Bob has had the privilege of working for some of America's largest and well run public and private companies, including Philip Morris, Canada Dry, Dr Pepper, Cadbury Schweppes, Snapple Beverage Corporation, Tasker Capital Corp. and The Water Club and River Cafe - two of New York's finest fine dining restaurants. He has worked in various capacities as Finance Manager, Controller, Director of Finance, Vice President Finance & Administration, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary, and Treasurer.

Bob holds a Masters of Business Administration degree in accounting from the University of Tennessee and a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting from the University of Arizona.

Southwest Beverages is a manufacturer and marketer of two brands of premium quality dry mix beverages: Sippity hot-cocoa mix and Kemosabe gourmet flavored coffee. All Southwest Beverages products are uniquely blended flavors that contain all the ingredients necessary for you to enjoy the ultimate hot beverage experience. Simply add water and stir-then sip, savor and enjoy.

For more information, please visit www.southwestbeverages.com.

Sippity, Sippity Lite, Kemosabe, Kemosabe Lite, Southwest Beverages, It's A DRY Mix and Comfort In A Cup are each registered trademarks of Southwest Beverages.

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